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Being An Elite Kred Influencer Can Be Very Rewarding

Are you one of the top 10%, 5% and 1% of Kred Influencers? See your Kred score here.

Congrats!

What does this mean?” or “What is the value of this?” 

The Kred team went through our database, looked at the distribution of the scores and found the people in the top 10%, 5% and 1% of the curve. Kred works on a double logarithmic scale, and being in the top 1% is a remarkable achievement.

To understand how Kred arrives at the transparent influence and outreach scores please visit the Kred Scoring Guide. You will also find a distribution curve and a distribution of scores.

As far as how your top influencer score can be translated from the gold badge and used in the real world, Sally Falkow @sallyfalkow, the CEO of Meritus Media explains:

Having a good influence score makes it easier for Falkow and her team to interact with other influencers as bloggers respond to someone who they can see has a digital presence and has been active on social networks for some time.  “We’re delighted with this recognition from Kred and we will display the Top 1% Influencer badge on our website, our blog and our Twitter feed,” says Falkow.

You Can Claim Rewards

As a top Kred Influencer you are likely to be eligible for various Kred Rewards. Everything from free Pantene products to invites to our exclusive VIP New York Influencers Summit. At the NY Summit next Wednesday February 6,  two Kred Stars will also be awarded a free trip to our London Summit on March 27, 2013.

Thank You

The amount of replies, congrats, retweets and sharing of our subscribers’ top scores has been incredible. Many have been asking and yes, we will be releasing the gold top influencer badge icon soon for you to share on your social profiles.

The email is praise, the gold badge is recognition and your Kred score is a set of statistics that backs it up.

Now go forth and spread the Kred.

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Kred Story Shows Big Bird Flying Over Romney and Obama

KredStory is a great way to see all the social media action around big events, like key US political events.  At Wednesday night’s first US presidential debate between President Obama and Mitt Romney, the most memorable character turned out to be an 8-foot tall yellow feathered icon whose best friend lives in a garbage can.  

Kred Story was a great way to see this trending topic arise in real time after Mr. Romney said he would end support for Big Bird’s television home, PBS.

Visit KredStory any time to get a free personal visual history of any @name, hashtag or trending topic – including yours!

Big Bird

One of the night’s most popular tweets included this reaction from the beloved Sesame Street star.

Big Bird is infrequently mentioned on Twitter, but the debate sent fans into high gear.

The #BigBird hashtag was most used in traditional Democratic strongholds.

Barack Obama

The President has one of Kred’s top influence scores and is one of the world’s most followed accounts.

He is consistently one of the world’s most mentioned people, with spikes around big news events.

These states are the ones that most frequently mention, retweet and reply to @BarackObama.

Mitt Romney

Governor Romney also has one of the world’s strongest social media influence scores.

The Governor is also frequently mentioned. During the debate, his mentions nearly equaled Obama’s.

The states where Mr. Romney is most influential contrasts with Mr. Obama’s top locations.

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Art Meets Social Media: GabyGaby creates paintings from the Kred Analytics of his Twitter followers

In a true mash-up of art, social media and data science, Kred Leader GabyGaby has turned his Twitter account into a series of paintings.  The Dutch multimedia artist is known for his unusual approaches to music, trends, iconography and nostalgia. He has shown in New York, Amsterdam, Zurich, and Vienna as well as creating site-specific works in Las Vegas and for the Tour de France.

Using the power of our 1,200 day social media archive, the Kred team started by extracting Twitter posts about @Gaby407, his followers and the most common words they use.  We then created a word cloud of his followers’ most used words, a list of the most mentioned colors in their posts, and the cities his followers most frequently tweet from.  Then we mailed this deep Kred Analytics Report over to Gaby’s studio in The Netherlands.

It turned out this was all the ‘Brainspiration‘ Gaby needed for the project, and last week he completed a series of three pieces based on the Kred Twitter data.

If you enjoy Gaby’s art, there is much more to explore at his web site and his accounts on Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook,  Flickr and YouTube.  Let us know your thoughts on the series in the comments below.

Click on any of the images for a larger view.

Follow the blue Dutchman

Based on the words blue, Netherlands and followers.

“New York used to be called New Amsterdam, so over here we still see the city a bit as The Netherlands. The color of our country is orange, so the orange man represent the Netherlands. Their heads are made from Delfts blue plates.  You can see they are all followers because they follow the one guy that started this blue plate thing – the big man in the middle.”

Some pink New York loving

Based on the words pink, New York and love.

“New York is a place to love and pink happens to be a cool color.   I combined all 3 three in one.  A big New York heart…”

Following the Green USA

Based on the words follow, green and USA.

“Green stand for money, so the background of this piece is made from a dollar print.  The arrows around the US flag show us to follow the USA to the money.  The black arrow tells us that some people in Europe might not think we should just always follow the US – it might bring us down.  Following is good but sometimes one needs to lead the pack.”

Here is a video of Gaby at the Kred Leaders Summit discussing his process for creating these pieces:

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Three keynoters make SXSW Day 2 Influence Top Ten; @TonyaHallRadio is Top Outreacher

Over 30,000 people tweeted with the #SXSW hashtag on March 10, and the Kred-powered SXSW Leaderboard captured all the day’s interactions action to find the Top 50 SXSWi Influencers and Outreachers.

@TonyaHallRadio placed first on the Outreach board for the second straight day.  Asked via Twitter to give the secret of her highly effective presence, @TonyaHallRadio said simply “Listening.”  

Yesterday’s top influencers were @JayZ (as anticipation grows around his upcoming show sponsored by @AmericanExpress), @youtube and @sxsw.  The highest ranking SWSXi people at were keynoters @rainnwilson, @baratunde, @dens and @ericries.  A highly anticipated speech at a crowded event is definitely a recipe for driving influence.

Influence is calculated by being mentioned, while Outreach results from mentioning others.  This means that Top Outreachers will often  be a very different set of folks from the Influencers. The Top Outreachers were  @TonyaHallRadio, followed by the all-important SXSW party account @sxswp and @qrioustweets.

Here are the Top 7 Influencers and Outreachers for March 10.  The rest of the Top 50 can be seen after the jump.

SXSW Day 2 Top Influencers & Outreachers

Continue Reading →

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@BillyCorben, @AlexDonno790 among Florida’s most influential on Republican primary

Following on our study of South Carolina, Kred analyzed tweets about the Florida Republican presidential primary to find the state’s most influential media and people talking about the candidates.  Many Florida-based Twitter accounts had higher Kred Influence among fellow Sunshine Staters than the candidates and well-known national media. We found that @BillyCorben, the fourth most influential Floridian discussing the primary, had more influence with fellow Florida citizens on the candidates than @RonPaul, @FoxNews@CBSNews@DrudgeReport and @Politico, among others.

We found several FL residents famous for reasons beyond politics whose views on the Republican candidates reached many responsive Floridians.  These included filmmaker @BillyCorben, professional golfer @PaulAzinger, and MMA commentator and outspoken Ron Paul supporter @AlexDonno790.

This again demonstrates the importance of engaging local rockstars in communities to spread a message.  Influence measures are essential for discovering people who can affect opinions among small networks of peers, friends and subject matter experts.

It’s also noteworthy that our Top 25 Florida influencers include three Spanish-language accounts: @Telemundo, @ElNuevoHerald and Univision journalist @LourdesStephen.

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‘Florida Influence’ was determined by looking at every Twitter interaction between November 1 and January 20 that:

  1. mentioned Mitt Romney, Ron Paul, Rick Perry, Newt Gingrich, or Rick Santorum; and
  2. was replied to or retweeted by someone in Florida

We then assigned each interaction ‘Florida Influence Points’ based on on our Kred Scoring System and compared these to their global scores.  We are able to do this through our partnership with Twitter; we have access to its full “firehose” of posts in real time as well as historical access to over 1,000 days of tweets.

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@ToddKincannon, @fitsblog are top influencers of South Carolina on Republican primary

We always say that ‘We always have Influence somewhere’ and to put that to the test we took a look at Kred Influence in the presidential primary process.   The question we posed is Who has most influenced South Carolina citizens about the Republican primary?  South Carolina provides a particularly interesting case because it votes ‘solo’ on Saturday, January 21 without any other state primaries on the same day and it has a relatively small electorate (only 445,000 voted in its 2008 Republican primary).

Our study shows that local influencers – both individuals and local media –  play a large role in the political decision making process in South Carolina.  We identified many SC-area Twitter accounts with higher Kred Influence about the primary among South Carolinians than national media outlets or the candidates themselves.   Further, these people are not necessarily well-known, connected to the candidates, or members of the media.

We determined ‘South Carolina Community Kred’ by looking at every Twitter interaction since November 1 that:

  1. mentioned Mitt Romney, Ron Paul, Rick Perry, Newt Gingrich, Jon Huntsman or Rick Santorum; and
  2. was replied to or retweeted by someone in South Carolina.

We then assigned each interaction ‘South Carolina Influence Points’ based on on our Kred Scoring System and compared these to their global scores.  We are able to do this through our partnership with Twitter; we have access to its full “firehose” of posts in real time as well as historical access to over 1,000 days of tweets.

Here are the top influencers based in South Carolina and top global influencers of South Carolinans about the Republican candidates:

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In particular, South Carolina attorney @ToddKincannon proved to be more influential among South Carolinians on the primary than anyone else, including the candidates’ own Twitter accounts and national media like @AP and @HuffingtonPost .

Another example: Greenville realtor @JamesAkersJr  has more South Carolina Kred Influence Points about the Republicans than @CBSNews or @CNNbrk.

A lot of attention has been paid this election cycle to the social media influence of the Republican candidates.  All of the candidates have unusually high Kred Influence; at this writing, @mittromney, @newtgingrich and @ronpaul have Kred Influence scores falling in a tight range between 966 and 973 — greater than 99.99% of the Twitter population.

This study proves that the real story really lies elsewhere.  In an election environment increasingly dominated by big money television buys, a candidate can make an impact with ‘retail’ campaigning by engaging influencers over social media channels.  The key is influence measures that can discover people in communities who can affect opinions among their networks of peers, friends and subject matter experts.

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